Sign up & Download
Sign in

Rhabdomyolysis: A review, with emphasis on the pediatric population

by Essam F. Elsayed, Robert F. Reilly
Pediatric Nephrology ()

Abstract

Rhabdomyolysis is a common clinical syndrome and accounts for 7% of all cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the USA. It can result from a wide variety of disorders, such as trauma, exercise, medications and infection, but in the pediatric population, infection and inherited disorders are the most common causes of rhabdomyolysis. Approximately half of patients with rhabdomyolysis present with the triad of myalgias, weakness and dark urine. The clinical suspicion, especially in the setting of trauma or drugs, is supported by elevated creatinine kinase levels and confirmed by the measurement of myoglobin levels in serum or urine. Muscle biopsy and genetic testing should be performed if rhabdomyolysis is recurrent or metabolic myopathy is suspected. Early recognition is important to prevent AKI through the use of aggressive hydration. Prevention is important in patients with inherited forms, but novel therapies may be developed with the better understanding of the pathophysiology and genetics of rhabdomyolysis.

Cite this document (BETA)

Readership Statistics

24 Readers on Mendeley
by Discipline
 
 
 
by Academic Status
 
17% Other Professional
 
13% Student (Bachelor)
 
13% Student (Postgraduate)
by Country
 
8% United States
 
4% Japan
 
4% Germany

Tags

Sign up today - FREE

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research. Learn more

  • All your research in one place
  • Add and import papers easily
  • Access it anywhere, anytime

Start using Mendeley in seconds!

Already have an account? Sign in