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Using and Reading Scholarly Literature.

by DW King, C Tenopir
Annual Review of Information Science and Technology of information science and technology ()

Abstract

Since the volume of scientific articles doubles every 15 to 17 years and the pressure to keep up is great, scientists face a daunting task of reading at the risk of being inadequately informed for carrying out their research and teaching. On top of this they face: the change of publication from paper to electronic media, preprints and publications stored digitally for electronic access, and conversion of retrospective collections to digital form. Reviews the events in readership found in the literature (including other reviews of journal use) over the past 40 to 50 years. Covers such topics as journal demand, journal use, use of separate copies of articles, readership of articles, time and cost of reading, usefulness and value of article information, information-seeking patterns, age of articles read, and factors affecting information-seeking and reading. Concludes that: (1) scientists continue to read a great deal and spend substantial time reading; (2) publications are the principal channel of communication for scientists, and they read scholarly journals far more than any other type of publication; (3) engineers rely more on other channels of communication; and (4) the high levels of usefulness and value of scholarly journals have persisted over the years. Provides numerous quantitative results to demonstrate trends in use, usefulness, and value of the literature, particularly regarding scholarly journals. Book Published by Information Today, Inc., 2001; Since the volume of scientific articles doubles every 15 to 17 years and the pressure to keep up is great, scientists face a daunting task of reading at the risk of being inadequately informed for carrying out their research and teaching. On top of this they face: the change of publication from paper to electronic media, preprints and publications stored digitally for electronic access, and conversion of retrospective collections to digital form. Reviews the events in readership found in the literature (including other reviews of journal use) over the past 40 to 50 years. Covers such topics as journal demand, journal use, use of separate copies of articles, readership of articles, time and cost of reading, usefulness and value of article information, information-seeking patterns, age of articles read, and factors affecting information-seeking and reading. Concludes that: (1) scientists continue to read a great deal and spend substantial time reading; (2) publications are the principal channel of communication for scientists, and they read scholarly journals far more than any other type of publication; (3) engineers rely more on other channels of communication; and (4) the high levels of usefulness and value of scholarly journals have persisted over the years. Provides numerous quantitative results to demonstrate trends in use, usefulness, and value of the literature, particularly regarding scholarly journals. Book Published by Information Today, Inc., 2001

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Readership Statistics

11 Readers on Mendeley
by Discipline
 
 
 
by Academic Status
 
36% Librarian
 
18% Lecturer
 
9% Other Professional
by Country
 
18% United States
 
9% United Kingdom
 
9% Spain

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