Behavior, affect, and cognition among psychogenic pain patients in group expressive psychotherapy

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Abstract

In an exploratory study, the authors examined the cognitions, affect, and behaviors reported by eight female depressed chronic pain patients during experiential therapy sessions that focused on anger and depression. Subjects appeared to fit previously developed psychologic profiles of patients with chronic pain disorder: they presented as conscientious, compliant, passive, and rule-bound, viewing life and emotional expression as dangerous, avoiding conflict and risk, denying their own emotional needs. Their reports were compared with the self-reported affect behavior and cognitions of eight depressed female patients without chronic pain, under similar therapeutic conditions. Considerable differences in style and content were found. Implications of these findings for clinical practice are discussed. © 1990.

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Corbishley, M. A., Hendrickson, R., Beutler, L. E., & Engle, D. (1990). Behavior, affect, and cognition among psychogenic pain patients in group expressive psychotherapy. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 5(4), 241–248. https://doi.org/10.1016/0885-3924(90)90018-F

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