National Survey of Behavior, Attitudes and Practice of General Practitioners and Various Specialists Concerning Antimicrobial Use And Resistance in Respiratory Tract Infections

  • Babela R
  • Slezakova Z
  • Szydlowski S
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Abstract

Objectives: We performed national survey of behavior, attitudes and practice of general practitioners (GP) and specialists (pediatricians, ENT, pulmonologists) at the field of antimicrobial (ATB) use for respiratory tract infections. Methods: A 34-item iPad iOS survey was performed personally with each GP and specialist during 7 months period. Results: The survey was completed by 357 GPs and specialists (61,9% and 38,1%, respectively). GPs and specialists were situated mostly in areas with population higher than 5000 people (49,3% and 48,5%), but GPs served significantly more often in area with population less than 5000 people compared to specialists (P< 0,001, CI 0,13 - 0,60). There was significantly higher number of GPs with practice shorter than 5 years compared to specialists (P< 0,01, CI 0,02-0,64). GPs used their own clinical experience in prescribing ATB more often compare to specialists (61,1% vs 43,4%, P< 0,01, CI 0,31-0,77) and specialist used more often ATB susceptibility reports compared to GPs (18,4% vs 8,1%, P< 0,01, CI 1,27-5,10), which also corresponds with frequency of checking susceptibility reports on monthly basis in specialists compared to GPs (23,5% vs 14,0% respectively, P< 0,04, CI 1,05-3,38). On contrary, more specialists chose to never discuss antibiotic treatment with patients compared to GPs (19,1% vs 7,2%, P< 0,001, CI 1,46-6,2) and there were more GPs that always discussed antibiotic treatment with patients compared to specialists (15,8% vs 5,9%, P< 0,01, CI 0,14-0,78). Patients' co-payment seems to be more sensitive issue for GPs compared to specialists since 29% of GPs considered co-payment all the time or most of the time when choosing ATB compared to specialists (18,4%, P= NS). Conclusions: This survey revealed that both GPs and specialists are aware of the importance of antimicrobial resistance and demonstrated differences between specialties with respect to antimicrobial use and knowledge. Antimicrobial education is needed but may be more effective if it is tailored to specific specialties.

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APA

Babela, R., Slezakova, Z., & Szydlowski, S. (2015). National Survey of Behavior, Attitudes and Practice of General Practitioners and Various Specialists Concerning Antimicrobial Use And Resistance in Respiratory Tract Infections. Value in Health, 18(7), A595–A596. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jval.2015.09.1546

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