Acne vulgaris, mental health and omega-3 fatty acids: A report of cases

37Citations
Citations of this article
188Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This artice is free to access.

Abstract

Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition, one that is associated with significant psychological disability. The psychological impairments in acne include higher rates of depression, anxiety, anger and suicidal thoughts. Despite a paucity of clinical research, patients with skin conditions and/or mental health disorders are frequent consumers of dietary supplements. An overlap may exist between nutrients that potentially have both anti-acne and mood regulating properties; examples include omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil, chromium, zinc and selenium. Here we report on five cases of acne treated with eicosapentaenoic acid and antioxidant nutrients. Self-administration of these nutrients may have improved inflammatory acne lesions and global aspects of well-being; the observations suggest a need for controlled trials. © 2008 Rubin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Rubin, M. G., Kim, K., & Logan, A. C. (2008). Acne vulgaris, mental health and omega-3 fatty acids: A report of cases. Lipids in Health and Disease, 7. https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-7-36

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free