The effect of monocular depth cues on the detection of moving objects by moving observers

6Citations
Citations of this article
17Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

An observer moving through the world must be able to identify and locate moving objects in the scene. In principle, one could accomplish this task by detecting object images moving at a different angle or speed than the images of other items in the optic flow field. While angle of motion provides an unambiguous cue that an object is moving relative to other items in the scene, a difference in speed could be due to a difference in the depth of the objects and thus is an ambiguous cue. We tested whether the addition of information about the distance of objects from the observer, in the form of monocular depth cues, aided detection of moving objects. We found that thresholds for detection of object motion decreased as we increased the number of depth cues available to the observer.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Royden, C. S., Parsons, D., & Travatello, J. (2016). The effect of monocular depth cues on the detection of moving objects by moving observers. Vision Research, 124, 7–14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2016.05.002

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free