Composition of bacterial and archaeal communities during landfill refuse decomposition processes

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Abstract

Little is known about the archaeal and the bacterial diversities in a landfill during different phases of decomposition. In this study, the archaeal and the bacterial diversities of Laogang landfill (Shanghai, China) at two different decomposition phases (i.e., initial methanogenic phase (IMP) and stable methanogenic phase (SMP)), were culture-independently examined using PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 47,753 sequences of 16S rRNA genes were retrieved from 69,954 reads and analyzed to evaluate the diversities of the archaeal and bacterial communities. The most predominant types of archaea were hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, and of bacteria were Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. As might be expected, their abundances varied at decomposition phases. Archaea Methanomicrobiales accounts for 97.6% of total archaeal population abundance in IMP and about 57.6% in SMP. The abundance of archaeal genus Halobacteriale was 0.1% in IMP and was 20.3% in the SMP. The abundance of Firmicutes was 21.3% in IMP and was 4.3% in SMP. The abundance of Bacteroidetes represented 11.5% of total bacterial in IMP and was dominant (49.4%) in SMP. Both the IMP and SMP had unique cellulolytic bacteria compositions. IMP consisted of members of Bacillus, Fibrobacter, and Eubacterium, while SMP harbored groups of Microbacterium. Both phases had Clostridium with different abundance, 4-5 folds higher in SMP.

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Song, L., Wang, Y., Zhao, H., & Long, D. T. (2015). Composition of bacterial and archaeal communities during landfill refuse decomposition processes. Microbiological Research, 181, 105–111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micres.2015.04.009

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