Implication of haematophagous arthropod salivary proteins in host-vector interactions

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Abstract

The saliva of haematophagous arthropods contains an array of anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules that contribute to the success of the blood meal. The saliva of haematophagous arthropods is also involved in the transmission and the establishment of pathogens in the host and in allergic responses. This survey provides a comprehensive overview of the pharmacological activity and immunogenic properties of the main salivary proteins characterised in various haematophagous arthropod species. The potential biological and epidemiological applications of these immunogenic salivary molecules will be discussed with an emphasis on their use as biomarkers of exposure to haematophagous arthropod bites or vaccine candidates that are liable to improve host protection against vector-borne diseases. © 2011 Fontaine et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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Fontaine, A., Diouf, I., Bakkali, N., Missé, D., Pagès, F., Fusai, T., … Almeras, L. (2011). Implication of haematophagous arthropod salivary proteins in host-vector interactions. Parasites and Vectors. BioMed Central Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-4-187

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