Why do children resist or obey their foster parents? The inner logic of children's behavior during discipline

ISSN: 00094021
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Abstract

This article discusses a study of children's perspectives on disciplinary conflicts with their foster parents. Most children accept parental authority, but they also defend their personal autonomy and loyalties to peers. In this study, only birthchildren told real-life stories about fierce resistance to get their own way. Fierce resistance among foster children was motivated by inner conflicts and confusion. Obedience among foster children often derived from fear of punishment or a feeling of impotence. The authors discuss the theoretical and pedagogical implications of these findings.

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APA

Singer, E., Doornenbal, J., & Okma, K. (2004, November). Why do children resist or obey their foster parents? The inner logic of children’s behavior during discipline. Child Welfare.

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