Longitudinal study of hearing loss and subjective cognitive function decline in men

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Abstract

Introduction: We examined the relation between self-reported hearing loss, hearing aid use, and risk of subjective cognitive function (SCF) decline. Methods: We conducted an 8-year (2008–2016) longitudinal study of 10,107 men aged ≥62 years who reported their hearing status in 2006 and had no subjective cognitive concerns in 2008. Change in SCF scores was assessed by a 6-item questionnaire, and subjective decline was defined as new report of at least one SCF concern during follow-up. Results: Hearing loss was associated with higher risk of SCF decline. Compared with no hearing loss, the multivariable-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) of incident SCF decline was 1.30 (1.18, 1.42), 1.42 (1.26, 1.61), and 1.54 (1.22, 1.96) among men with mild, moderate, and severe hearing loss (no hearing aids), respectively (P-trend < .001). Among men with severe hearing loss who used hearing aids, the multivariable-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) was 1.37 (1.18, 1.60). Discussion: Hearing loss was associated with substantially higher risk of subsequent subjective cognitive decline in men.

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Curhan, S. G., Willett, W. C., Grodstein, F., & Curhan, G. C. (2019). Longitudinal study of hearing loss and subjective cognitive function decline in men. Alzheimer’s and Dementia, 15(4), 525–533. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2018.11.004

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