Participación de las proteínas de unión a la actina y vías de señalización asociadas a la formación y mantenimiento de las espinas dendríticas

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Abstract

Introduction: Dendritic spines are the main sites of excitatory synaptic contacts. Moreover, they present plastic responses to different stimuli present in synaptic activity or damage, ranging from an increase or decrease in their total number, to redistribution of progenitor dendritic spines, to variations in their size or shape. However, the spines can remain stable for a long time. Background: The use of experimental models has shown that different molecules of the F-actin binding and signalling pathways are closely related to the development, maintenance and plasticity of excitatory synapses, which could affect the number, size and shape of the dendritic spines; these mechanisms affect and depend on the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton. Development: It is proposed that the filopodia are precursors of dendritic spines. Drebrin is an F-actin binding protein, and it is responsible for concentrating F-actin and PSD-95 in filopodia that will guide the formation of the new spines. Conclusion: The specific mechanisms of actin regulation are an integral part in the formation, maturing process and plasticity of dendritic spines in association with the various actin cytoskeleton-binding proteins The signalling pathways mediated by small GTPases and the equilibrium between G-actin and F-actin are also involved. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología.

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Soria Fregozo, C., & Pérez Vega, M. I. (2012, September). Participación de las proteínas de unión a la actina y vías de señalización asociadas a la formación y mantenimiento de las espinas dendríticas. Neurologia. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nrl.2011.10.005

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