Maize purple plant pigment protects against fluoride-induced oxidative damage of liver and kidney in rats

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Abstract

Anthocyanins are polyphenols and well known for their biological antioxidative benefits. Maize purple plant pigment (MPPP) extracted and separated from maize purple plant is rich in anthocyanins. In the present study, MPPP was used to alleviate the adverse effects generated by fluoride on liver and kidney in rats. The results showed that the ultrastructure of the liver and kidney in fluoride treated rats displayed shrinkage of nuclear and cell volume, swollen mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and vacuols formation in the liver and kidney cells. MPPP significantly attenuated these fluoride-induced pathological changes. The MDA levels in serum and liver tissue of fluoride alone treated group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05). The presence of 5 g/kg MPPP in the diet reduced the elevation of MDA levels in blood and liver, and increased the SOD and GSH-Px activities in kidney and GSH level in liver and kidney compared with the fluoride alone treated group (p < 0.05). In addition, MPPP alleviated the decrease of Bcl-2 protein expression and the increase of Bax protein expression induced by fluoride. This study demonstrated the protective role of MPPP against fluoride-induced oxidative stress in liver and kidney of rats. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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Zhang, Z., Zhou, B., Wang, H., Wang, F., Song, Y., Liu, S., & Xi, S. (2014). Maize purple plant pigment protects against fluoride-induced oxidative damage of liver and kidney in rats. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(1), 1020–1033. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110101020

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