Adaptive changes in the pyloric motor response to intraduodenal dextrose in normal subjects

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Abstract

Gastric emptying of glucose is faster after dietary supplementation of glucose, suggesting specific adaptation to changes in nutrient intake. In the present study, the effects of a continuous long-term (0-120-minute) and two short-term (0-20- and 80-100-minute) intraduodenal infusions of dextrose (2.4 kcal/min) on antropyloroduodenal motility and blood glucose, plasma gastric inhibitory polypeptide, and insulin concentrations were evaluated in nine volunteers. In four volunteers, an intraduodenal infusion of triglyceride (2.4 kcal/min) was administered immediately after the long-term dextrose infusion. The long-term dextrose infusion initially increased isolated pyloric pressure waves (IPPWs) and basal pyloric pressure (P < 0.05 for both), but after about 30 minutes IPPWs and basal pyloric pressure decreased and returned to baseline within 80 minutes. Each short-term infusion increased IPPWs and basal pyloric pressure (P < 0.05 for both). Antral pressure waves remained suppressed during the long-term dextrose infusion. Intraduodenal triglyceride increased IPPWs and basal pyloric pressure (P < 0.05 for both). The long-term dextrose infusion was associated with a sustained increase, and both short-term dextrose infusions were associated with peaks in glucose, insulin, and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels. There was no significant relationship between biochemical measurements and antropyloroduodenal motility. It is concluded that specific adaptive changes occur rapidly in the phasic and tonic pyloric motor response, but not the antral motor response, to intraduodenal dextrose. © 1992.

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Edelbroek, M., Horowitz, M., Fraser, R., Wishart, J., Morris, H., Dent, J., & Akkermans, L. (1992). Adaptive changes in the pyloric motor response to intraduodenal dextrose in normal subjects. Gastroenterology, 103(6), 1754–1761. https://doi.org/10.1016/0016-5085(92)91431-3

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