How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

2Citations
Citations of this article
17Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors' conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Colombo, L., & Prior, M. (2016). How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude. Ilha Do Desterro, 69(3), 115–124. https://doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free