The effect of an electronic medical record intervention on hydroxychloroquine prescribing habits and surveyed providers’ opinions of the 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines in the rheumatology and dermatology practices of an academic institutionle

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Abstract

Background: Retinal toxicity is a rare adverse event related to the use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). To address this, in 2016, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) issued guidelines recommending that HCQ not exceed 5 mg/kg/day. We analyzed HCQ prescribing habits at our institution, compared to these guidelines, and used surveys to determine the opinions on these guidelines. We then introduced, in a prospective and non-controlled study, a clinical decision support (CDS) tool into the electronic medical record (EMR) to study how this intervention might affect adherence with or opinions on these guidelines. Methods: Data were collected pre-intervention (June 2017–January 2019) and post-intervention (March 2019–April 2020). In January 2019 we released our CDS tool. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics for demographic data and Fisher’s exact tests for comparisons of proportions between groups. Results: Pre-intervention, we reviewed 1128 rheumatology charts and 282 dermatology charts. 31.0 and 39.7% respectively (32.8% combined) were prescribed HCQ > 5.0 mg/kg/day. Post-intervention, we reviewed 1161 rheumatology charts and 110 dermatology charts. 23.0 and 25.5% respectively (23.2% combined) were prescribed HCQ > 5.0 mg/kg/day. Post-intervention, 9.6% fewer patients were prescribed HCQ > 5 mg/kg/day (P

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Overbury, R. S., Stoddard, G. J., Pupaibool, J., Hansen, C. B., & Lebiedz-Odrobina, D. (2021). The effect of an electronic medical record intervention on hydroxychloroquine prescribing habits and surveyed providers’ opinions of the 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines in the rheumatology and dermatology practices of an academic institutionle. BMC Health Services Research, 21(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-06954-8

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