Pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C in spread monolayers at the air-water interface: I. Monolayers of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B and phospholipids

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Abstract

The effects of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B on the properties of monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and a mixture of DPPC:DPPG (7:3, mol:mol) were studied using spread films at the air-water interface. The addition of SP-B to the phospholipid monolayers gave positive deviations from additivity of the mean areas in the films. At low protein concentrations (less than 45% amino acid residues which corresponds to 0.5 mol% or 10 weight% SP-B) monolayers of SP-B/DPPC, SP-B/DPPG and SP-B/(DPPC:DPPG) collapsed at surface pressures of about 70 mN.m-1, comparable to those of the lipids alone. At higher concentrations of SP-B in the protein-lipid monolayers, kink points appeared in the isotherms at about 40–45 mN.m-1, implying possible exclusion of material from the films, hence, changes in the original monolayer compositions. Calculated analyses of the monolayer compositions as a function of surface pressure indicated that nearly pure SP-B, associated with small amounts of phospholipid (2–3 lipid molecules per SP-B dimer), was lost from SP-B/DPPC, SP-B/DPPG, and SP-B/(DPPC:DPPG) films at surface pressures higher than 40–45 mN.m-1. The results are consistent with a low effectiveness of SP-B in removing saturated phospholipids, DPPC or DPPG, from the spread SP-B/phospholipid films. © 1994, The Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

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APA

Taneva, S., & Keough, K. M. (1994). Pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C in spread monolayers at the air-water interface: I. Monolayers of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B and phospholipids. Biophysical Journal, 66(4), 1137–1148. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3495(94)80895-1

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