Spinal cord deficit after 1114 extent II open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repairs

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Abstract

Objective: Crawford extent II repairs are the most extensive thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm operations and pose the greatest risk of postoperative spinal cord deficit. We sought to examine spinal cord deficit after open extent II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair to identify predictors of the most serious type: persistent paraplegia or paraparesis. Methods: We included 1114 extent II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed from 1991 to 2017. Intercostal/lumbar artery reattachment (n = 959, 86.1%) and cerebrospinal fluid drainage (n = 698, 62.7%) were used to mitigate the risk of postoperative spinal cord deficit. We used univariate and multivariable analyses to examine spinal cord deficit and identify predictors of persistent paraplegia or paraparesis, defined as paraplegia or paraparesis present at the time of early death or hospital discharge. Results: Spinal cord deficit developed after 151 (13.6%) repairs: 86 (7.7%) cases of persistent paraplegia or paraparesis (51 paraplegia; 35 paraparesis) and 65 (6.1%) cases of transient paraplegia or paraparesis. Patients with spinal cord deficit were older (median 68 vs 65 years, P < .001) and had more rupture (6.6% vs 2.2%, P = .002) and urgent/emergency repair (25.2% vs 16.9%, P = .01) than those without. Persistent paraplegia or paraparesis developed immediately in 47 patients (4.2%) and was delayed in 39 patients (3.5%). Urgent/emergency repair (relative risk ratio, 2.31; P = .002), coronary artery disease (relative risk ratio, 1.80, P = .01), and chronic symptoms (relative risk ratio, 1.76, P = .02) independently predicted persistent paraplegia or paraparesis. Reattaching intercostal/lumbar arteries (relative risk ratio, 0.38, P < .001) and heritable disease (relative risk ratio, 0.36, P = .01) were protective. Early and late survival were poorer in those with persistent paraplegia or paraparesis than in those without. Conclusions: Spinal cord deficit after extent II thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repairs remains concerning; survival is worse in patients with persistent paraplegia or paraparesis. The complexity of spinal cord deficit and persistent paraplegia or paraparesis warrant further study.

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Coselli, J. S., Green, S. Y., Price, M. D., Zhang, Q., Preventza, O., de la Cruz, K. I., … LeMaire, S. A. (2020). Spinal cord deficit after 1114 extent II open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repairs. In Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Vol. 159, pp. 1–13). Mosby Inc. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.01.120

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