Digital arterial responsiveness to cold in healthy men, vibration white finger and primary Raynaud's phenomenon

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Abstract

Finger systolic pressure (FSP) was measured during a standardized cold test in 291 healthy male subjects divided into five age groups. The age groups showed no difference in the change in FSP (FSP%) after cold provocation at 15 and 10°C. In the entire population, the lower normal limits of FSP% were estimated as 76% at 15°C and 63% at 10°C. When a discriminating threshold of FSP%(10°)<60% was applied to the results of the cold test of 31 referents, 65 chain saw workers with or without vibration-induced white finger (VWF), and 20 male patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP), the sensitivity of the test to detect digital vasospasm was 84% for VWF and 95% for PRP. In the chain-saw worker group, the positive and negative predictive values of the cold test were 94%. Therefore the measurement of FSP during cold provocation can be considered a useful laboratory test to confirm Raynaud's symptoms objectively in both groups and individuals.

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APA

Bovenzi, M. (1993). Digital arterial responsiveness to cold in healthy men, vibration white finger and primary Raynaud’s phenomenon. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 19(4), 271–276. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.1474

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