Assisted survival, aging, and rehabilitation needs: Comparison of older dialysis patients and age-matched peers

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Abstract

In Western societies a growing number of older persons have their lives extended by medical or surgical intervention. Older persons who suffer kidney failure and are maintained by chronic dialysis therapy are a good example. We compared 349 persons aged 60 years or older, who were on chronic dialysis, with 354 persons similar in age, race, gender, and geographic residence who were not undergoing dialysis. Recent health problems and demographic characteristics were included as control variables in all analyses. Older persons on dialysis reported more functional disability (as measured by ADL-mobility difficulty), less frequent walking for exercise, decreased ability to do the things they would like to do, and lower levels of perceived mastery over their lives. They were also more likely to report a need for health-related aids or services. The residual impairments of disabled elderly persons challenge rehabilitation profesionals to address quality of life issues. © 1992.

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Kutner, N. G., & Brogan, D. J. (1992). Assisted survival, aging, and rehabilitation needs: Comparison of older dialysis patients and age-matched peers. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 73(4), 309–315. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-9993(92)90001-D

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