Do mass deworming efforts improve the developmental health and well-being of children in low-and middle-income countries? Summary of the evidence and implications for public health programmes

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Abstract

Objective: This evidence summary of a Campbell systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of mass deworming for soil transmitted helminthes with or without deworming for schistosomiasis or co-interventions on growth, educational achievement, cognition, school attendance, quality of life and adverse effects in children from randomized trials, quasi-randomized trials, controlled before after studies, interrupted time series and quasi-experimental studies. Methods: Summary of evidence was prepared using standard methods for conducting and reporting evidence summary and using SUPPORT summary format. Results: The Campbell review included data from 66 studies covering 1,092,120 children (6 months–16 years) in high, medium, and low helminthes-endemic areas from 23 low and middle-income countries. As compared to previous reviews on the topic, the different conclusions of current review are due to inclusion of more studies and adoption of a strict criterion for the certainty of evidence. Conclusion: The review found that mass deworming for soil transmitted helminthes had little to no effect on child health and other well-being measures.

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John, D., & Issac, A. (2018). Do mass deworming efforts improve the developmental health and well-being of children in low-and middle-income countries? Summary of the evidence and implications for public health programmes. Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health, 6(4), 220–224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cegh.2018.09.004

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