A colorimetric sensor for the highly selective detection of sulfide and 1,4-dithiothreitol based on the in situ formation of silver nanoparticles using dopamine

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Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has attracted attention in biochemical research because it plays an important role in biosystems and has emerged as the third endogenous gaseous signaling compound along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Since H2S is a kind of gaseous molecule, conventional approaches for H2S detection are mostly based on the detection of sulfide (S2−) for indirectly reflecting H2S levels. Hence, there is a need for an accurate and reliable assay capable of determining sulfide in physiological systems. We report here a colorimetric, economic, and green method for sulfide anion detection using in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using dopamine as a reducing and protecting agent. The changes in the AgNPs absorption response depend linearly on the concentration of Na2S in the range from 2 to 15 µM, with a detection limit of 0.03 µM. Meanwhile, the morphological changes in AgNPs in the presence of S2− and thiol compounds were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The as-synthetized AgNPs demonstrate high selectivity, free from interference, especially by other thiol compounds such as cysteine and glutathione. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor developed was applied to the analysis of sulfide in fetal bovine serum and spiked serum samples with good recovery.

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Zhao, L., Zhao, L., Miao, Y., Liu, C., & Zhang, C. (2017). A colorimetric sensor for the highly selective detection of sulfide and 1,4-dithiothreitol based on the in situ formation of silver nanoparticles using dopamine. Sensors (Switzerland), 17(3). https://doi.org/10.3390/s17030626

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