LACTATEing Salmonella: A Host-Derived Fermentation Product Fuels Pathogen Growth

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Abstract

Infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is accompanied by dysbiosis and a decrease of microbiota-derived butyrate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Gillis et al. (2018) demonstrate that the lack of butyrate reprograms colonic epithelial metabolism toward lactate fermentation. Lactate is then used as a respiratory electron donor, supporting Salmonella growth and thus promoting infection. Infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is accompanied by dysbiosis and a decrease of microbiota-derived butyrate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Gillis et al. demonstrate that the lack of butyrate reprograms colonic epithelial metabolism toward lactate fermentation. Lactate is then used as a respiratory electron donor, supporting Salmonella growth and thus promoting infection.

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Stecher, B., & Jung, K. (2018, January 10). LACTATEing Salmonella: A Host-Derived Fermentation Product Fuels Pathogen Growth. Cell Host and Microbe. Cell Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2017.12.012

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