Influence of adult attachment insecurities on parenting self-esteem: The mediating role of dyadic adjustment

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Abstract

Background: Parenting self-esteem includes two global components, parents' selfefficacy and satisfaction with their parental role, and has a crucial role in parent-child interactions. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrative model linking adult attachment insecurities, dyadic adjustment, and parenting self-esteem. Methods: The study involved 118 pairs (236 subjects) of heterosexual parents of a firstborn child aged 0-6 years. They were administered the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) questionnaire, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale. Results: Path analysis was used to design and test a theoretical integrative model, achieving a good fit with the data. Findings showed that dyadic adjustment mediates the negative influence on parenting self-efficacy of both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. Parenting satisfaction is positively influenced by parenting self-efficacy and negatively affected by child's age. Attachment anxiety negatively influences parenting satisfaction. Conclusion: Our findings are in line with the theoretical expectations and have promising implications for future research and intervention programs designed to improve parenting self-esteem.

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Calvo, V., & Bianco, F. (2015). Influence of adult attachment insecurities on parenting self-esteem: The mediating role of dyadic adjustment. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(SEP), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01461

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