Is there an association between central venous pressure measurement and ultrasound assessment of the inferior vena cava?

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Abstract

Introduction: Early assessment of volume status is paramount in critically ill patients. Central venous pressure (CVP) measurement and ultrasound assessment of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are both used for volume assessment in the emergency centre. Recent data is conflicting over whether there is a correlation between CVP and ultrasound assessment of the IVC. Methods: This was a retrospective review of an audit previously performed in the Emergency Unit of Ngwelezane Hospital in Kwazulu-Natal. The audit involved measuring inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC-CI) within 5 min of CVP measurement. In this retrospective study, audit data were analysed to determine if an association exists. Results: Twenty-four patients were included. The median age of participants was 36 (IQR 42) years (95% CI 33–56). The median time to ultrasound was 18.6 (52.5) h (95% CI 7.5–36.2). The mean CVP was 13.7 ± 7.7 cm H2O and mean IVC-CI was 39.4 ± 17.8%. Based on a Pearson correlation test, there was a weak negative correlation between CVP and IVC-CI, which was not statistically significant (r = −0.05, n = 24, p = 0.81, 95% CI −0.5 to 0.4) for all participants. However, among females there was a moderate negative correlation between CVP and IVC-CI, which was not statistically significant (r = −0.43, n = 7, p = 0.34, 95% CI −0.9 to 0.5), while among males there was a weak positive correlation, which was not statistically significant (r = 0.16, n = 17, p = 0.53, 95% CI −0.3 to 0.6). Discussion: There is no significant correlation between CVP and IVC-CI. Further validation research is required to support our preliminary findings of no significant correlation between CVP measurement and ultrasound assessment of the IVC. CVP and IVC ultrasound should be used as clinical adjuncts, and not as stand-alone measures of volume assessment.

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APA

Govender, J., Postma, I., Wood, D., & Sibanda, W. (2018). Is there an association between central venous pressure measurement and ultrasound assessment of the inferior vena cava? African Journal of Emergency Medicine, 8(3), 106–109. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.afjem.2018.03.004

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