Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: Halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production

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Abstract

Background: Desflurane and enflurane have been reported to produce substantial amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) in desiccated sodalime. Isoflurane is said to produce less CO and sevoflurane and halothane should produce no CO at all. The purpose of this study is to measure the maximum amounts of CO production for all modern volatile anesthetics, with completely dry sodalime. We also tried to establish a relationship between CO production and temperature increase inside the sodalime. Methods: A patient model was simulated using a circle anesthesia system connected to an artificial lung. Completely desiccated sodalime (950 grams) was used in this system. A low flow anesthesia (500ml/min) was maintained using nitrous oxide with desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane or sevoflurane. For immediate quantification of CO production a portable gas chromatograph was used. Temperature was measured within the sodalime container. Results: Peak concentrations of CO were very high with desflurane and enflurane (14262 and 10654 ppm respectively). It was lower with isoflurane (2512 ppm). We also measured small concentrations of CO for sevoflurane and halothane. No significant temperature increases were detected with high CO productions. Conclusions: All modern volatile anesthetics produce CO in desiccated sodalime. Sodalime temperature increase is a poor predictor of CO production. © 2005 Keijzer et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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Keijzer, C., Perez, R. S. G. M., & de Lange, J. J. (2005). Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: Halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production. BMC Anesthesiology, 5. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2253-5-6

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