Reliability of the assessment of lumbar range of motion and maximal isometric strength

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the interobserver reliability and intrasubject variability of the assessment of lumbar range of motion (ROM) and maximal isometric strength in asymptomatic subjects by using commercially available equipment. Design: A cross-sectional repeated-measures design. Setting: Ambulatory care in a university hospital. Participants: Convenience sample of 61 asymptomatic healthy subjects aged 20 to 55 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Six movements of the lumbar spine were assessed with commercially available equipment. Both the ROM and the maximal isometric strength for flexion, extension, lateroflexion, and rotation of the lumbar spine were assessed by 2 investigators who were blinded to the outcome of the assessment performed by their colleague. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was above .95 for all the strength measurements. For the assessment of the ROM of the lumbar spine, the ICC varied between .77 and .94. There was a significant intrasubject variability for 8 of 12 measurements. Conclusions: The interobserver reliability is excellent for the measurement of the maximal isometric strength and good for the assessment of the ROM of the lumbar spine. There is a significant intrasubject variability, which requires the use of the mean or the best value of different trials. © 2006 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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Roussel, N., Nijs, J., Truijen, S., Breugelmans, S., Claes, I., & Stassijns, G. (2006). Reliability of the assessment of lumbar range of motion and maximal isometric strength. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87(4), 576–582. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2006.01.007

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