Different plaque composition and progression in patients with stable and unstable coronary syndromes evaluated by cardiac CT

5Citations
Citations of this article
24Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objective. To compare the quantity, subtype, and progression of atherosclerosis by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with stable (SAP) and unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (UAP/n-STEMI). Methods. Forty patients with SAP and 20 with UAP/n-STEMI underwent cardiac CT and angiography with IVUS at baseline and after one year. Atherosclerotic segments were divided into calcified, mixed, or noncalcified subtypes, and significant stenoses were registered. Results. Thirty-two SAP and 15 UAP/n-STEMI patients completed the CT follow-up. At baseline, the number of atherosclerotic segments was higher in UAP/n-STEMI than in SAP (P = 0.039). UAP/n-STEMI patients had more segments with noncalcified plaques (P = 0.0005) whereas SAP patients had more segments with calcified plaques (P = 0.013). The number of segments with significant stenosis did not differ between the groups, but noncalcified plaques more frequently caused significant stenoses in UAP/n-STEMI than in SAP patients (P = 0.0002). After one year the number of segments with atherosclerosis increased in SAP patients (P = 0.0001). The number of atherosclerotic segments remained unchanged in UAP/n-STEMI patients. However, composition was altered as the number of segments with noncalcified plaques decreased (P = 0.018). IVUS data confirmed the CT findings. Conclusion. Quantity, subtype, and progression of atherosclerosis differ between SAP and UAP/n-STEMI patients.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Dalager, M. G., Bøttcher, M., Thygesen, J., Andersen, G., & Bøtker, H. E. (2015). Different plaque composition and progression in patients with stable and unstable coronary syndromes evaluated by cardiac CT. BioMed Research International, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/401357

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free