High intensity training may reverse the fiber type specific decline in myogenic stem cells in multiple sclerosis patients

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Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. The myogenic stem cells (satellite cells-SCs) are instrumental to accretion of myonuclei, but remain to be investigated in MS. The present study aimed to compare the SC and myonuclei content between MS patients (n = 23) and age matched healthy controls (HC, n = 18). Furthermore, the effects of 12 weeks of high intensity training on SC and myonuclei content were explored in MS. Muscle biopsies were obtained from m. Vastus Lateralis at baseline (MS and HC) and following 12 weeks of training (MS only). Frozen biopsies were sectioned followed by immunohistochemical analysis for fiber type specific SCs (Pax7+), myonuclei (MN) and central nuclei content and fiber cross-sectional area (fCSA) was quantified using ATPase histochemistry. At baseline the SCs per fiber was lower in type II compared to type I fibers in both MS (119%, p < 0.01) and HC (69%, p < 0.05), whereas the SCs per fCSA was lower in type II fibers compared to type I only in MS (72%, p < 0.05). No differences were observed in MN or central nuclei between MS and HC. Following training the type II fiber SCs per fiber and per fCSA in MS patients increased by 165% (p < 0.05) and 135% (p < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, the type II fiber MN content tended (p = 0.06) to be increased by 35% following training. In conclusion, the SC content is lower in type II compared to type I fibers in both MS and HC. Furthermore, high intensity training was observed to selectively increase the SC and myonuclei content in type II fibers in MS patients.

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Farup, J., Dalgas, U., Keytsman, C., Eijnde, B. O., & Wens, I. (2016). High intensity training may reverse the fiber type specific decline in myogenic stem cells in multiple sclerosis patients. Frontiers in Physiology, 7(MAY). https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2016.00193

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