Migratory and adhesive cues controlling innate-like lymphocyte surveillance of the pathogen-exposed surface of the lymph node

35Citations
Citations of this article
57Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Lymph nodes (LNs) contain innate-like lymphocytes that survey the subcapsular sinus (SCS) and associated macrophages for pathogen entry. The factors promoting this surveillance behavior have not been defined. Here, we report that IL7RhiCcr6+ lymphocytes in mouse LNs rapidly produce IL17 upon bacterial and fungal challenge. We show that these innate-like lymphocytes are mostly LN resident. Ccr6 is required for their accumulation near the SCS and for efficient IL17 induction. Migration into the SCS intrinsically requires S1pr1, whereas movement from the sinus into the parenchyma involves the integrin LFA1 and its ligand ICAM1. CD169, a sialic acid-binding lectin, helps retain the cells within the sinus, preventing their loss in lymph flow. These findings establish a role for Ccr6 in augmenting innate-like lymphocyte responses to lymph-borne pathogens, and they define requirements for cell movement between parenchyma and SCS in what we speculate is a program of immune surveillance that helps achieve LN barrier immunity.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Zhang, Y., Roth, T. L., Gray, E. E., Chen, H., Rodda, L. B., Liang, Y., … Cyster, J. G. (2016). Migratory and adhesive cues controlling innate-like lymphocyte surveillance of the pathogen-exposed surface of the lymph node. ELife, 5(AUGUST). https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18156

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free