Mnemonic strategy training of the elderly at risk for dementia enhances integration of information processing via cross-frequency coupling

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Abstract

Introduction We sought to identify whether intensive 10-week mobile health mnemonic strategy training (MST) could shift the resting-state brain network more toward cortical-level integration, which has recently been proven to reflect the reorganization of the brain networks compensating the cognitive decline. Methods One hundred fifty-eight patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were selected and participated in 10-week training lasting 90 min/d of memory training. They benefited from an initial and a follow-up neuropsychological evaluation and resting-state electroencephalography (EEG). Results At follow-up, MST revealed an extensive significant training effect that changed the network with an increase of synchronization between parietotemporal and frontal areas; frontalθ-parietalα2 causal strengthening as part of top-down inhibitory control; enhancement of sensorimotor connections in β band; and a general increase of cortical-level integration. More precisely, MST induced gain as an increase of the global cost efficiency (GCE) of the whole cortical network and a neuropsychological performance improvement, which was correlated with it (r = 0.32, P = .0001). The present study unfolded intervention changes based on EEG source activity via novel neuroinformatic tools for revealing intrinsic coupling modes in both amplitude-phase representations and in the mixed spectrospatiotemporal domain. Discussion Further work should identify whether the GCE enhancement of the functional cortical brain networks is a compensation mechanism to the brain network dysfunction or a more permanent neuroplasticity effect.

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APA

Dimitriadis, S. I., Tarnanas, I., Wiederhold, M., Wiederhold, B., Tsolaki, M., & Fleisch, E. (2016). Mnemonic strategy training of the elderly at risk for dementia enhances integration of information processing via cross-frequency coupling. Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions, 2(4), 241–249. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trci.2016.08.004

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