Intestinal effects of the products of lipid digestion on gastric electrical activity in the cat. Possible involvement of vagal intestinal receptors sensitive to lipids

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Abstract

The relationship between the lipid content of the intestinal lumen and gastric motor activity was studied in anesthetized cats. For this purpose the electromyographic activity was recorded in the antrum whereas the small intestine (duodenum and first part of jejunum or ileum) was perfused with various solutions including calcium propionate, tributyrin, sodium caprylate, potassium oleate, mixtures containing linoleic acid, monolein, triolein, mixture of triglycerides, and glycerol. Long-chain lipids and glycerol both induced a decrease in the rate of basal antral activity. This effect was found to depend on the state of lipid hydrolysis (triglycerides, monoglycerides, and fatty acids) and was most marked with monolein, linoleic acid, and glycerol. With the middle-chain lipids used, these effects were only slight; short-chain lipids did not induce any visible changes in gastric activity. All these effects were prevented by cervical bivagotomy. It was concluded that the two types of lipid-sensitive vagal receptors, which we recently showed to exist in the small intestine, trigger an inhibitory enterogastric reflex that contributes to the regulation of gastric emptying. © 1991.

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Melone, J., & Mei, N. (1991). Intestinal effects of the products of lipid digestion on gastric electrical activity in the cat. Possible involvement of vagal intestinal receptors sensitive to lipids. Gastroenterology, 100(2), 380–387. https://doi.org/10.1016/0016-5085(91)90206-Z

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