Pedestrian accidents on Merseyside: the case for criminalization of jaywalking

6Citations
Citations of this article
11Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

During a 12-month review within Merseyside, 85 serious pedestrian accidents (ISS > 15 or death), were identified. Analysis of police accident statistics showed that 17 per cent of these cases had not been recorded. Children and the elderly made up 64 per cent of those injured. Accidents were more common in the afternoon and evening and evenly spread throughout the week. There was a low rate of alcohol testing among casualties who died and involved drivers. The majority of accidents occurred in good visibility and weather; 90 per cent were due to pedestrian behaviour. © 1993.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Teanby, D. N., Gorman, D. F., & Boot, D. A. (1993). Pedestrian accidents on Merseyside: the case for criminalization of jaywalking. Injury, 24(1), 10–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/0020-1383(93)90073-F

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free