Cisplatin resistance by induction of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 in human bladder cancer cells

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Abstract

Cisplatin is currently the most effective anti-tumor agent available against bladder cancer. To clarify the mechanism underlying cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer, the present study examined the role of the aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2) protein on chemoresistance using a human bladder cancer cell line. The function of AKR1C2 in chemoresistance was studied using the human HT1376 bladder cancer cell line and the cisplatin-resistant HT1376-CisR subline. AKR1C2 was expressed in HT1376-CisR cells, but not in the parental cells. The effect of small interfering (si) RNAs and an inhibitor targeting AKR1C2 was examined to determine whether cisplatin sensitivity can be rescued by blocking AKR1C2 expression or function. Silencing of AKR1C2 mRNA or inhibition of AKR1C2 by 5β-cholanic acid resulted in a decrease in the survival of cells following cisplatin exposure. Intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) fluorescent probe. Cisplatin exposure increased the level of intracellular ROS in HT1376 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ROS levels in HT1376-CisR cells were significantly lower than those in HT1376 cells and knockdown of AKR1C2 mRNA significantly restored ROS levels. Cisplatin exposure did not increase intracellular ROS in HT1376-CisR cells, although the level of intracellular ROS increased in HT1376 cells following cisplatin exposure. Silencing of AKR1C2 mRNA restored the ROS increase response to cisplatin and menadione as an oxidative stressor in HT1376-CisR cells. Menadione has the function of an oxidative stressor. The silencing of AKR1C2 mRNA restored the increased ROS response to cisplatin and menadione in HT1376-CisR cells. These results indicate that induction of AKR1C2 in human bladder cancer cells aids in the development of cisplatin resistance through antioxidative effects. The results of this study indicate that AKR1C2 may be an effective molecular target for restoring cisplatin resistance.

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APA

Shirato, A., Kikugawa, T., Miura, N., Tanji, N., Takemori, N., Higashiyama, S., & Yokoyama, M. (2014). Cisplatin resistance by induction of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 in human bladder cancer cells. Oncology Letters, 7(3), 674–678. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2013.1768

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