The changing epidemiology of Burkholderia species infection at an adult cystic fibrosis centre

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Abstract

Background: This study reviews the impact of changing infection control practices at the Manchester Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre (MACFC) upon the epidemiology of Burkholderia species infections. Methods: We reviewed strain and genomovar typing of all available Burkholderia isolates at our centre between 1983-2006. Results: The incidence/prevalence of infection with Burkholderia species between 1983-1990 was below 5%/9% each year. There was a rise in incidence/prevalence of Burkholderia species between 1991 and 1994 with a peak of 16.3%/31.2% in 1992. Following complete cohort segregation, the incidence has fallen to below 3% for all but one year and the prevalence has gradually reduced to 9.3% in 2005. Currently, there is an increase in the prevalence to 10.6% for the first time since 1994, predominantly due to patients with unique infections transferring into the unit from referring centres. The presence of unique strains now exceeds transmissible strains for the first time since 1991. Conclusions: Infection control measures including patient segregation have controlled spread of transmissible B. cenocepacia strains, but not the acquisition of unique strains. Unique strains of Burkholderia species now account for the majority of new infections at the Manchester Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre. Crown Copyright © 2008.

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APA

France, M. W., Dodd, M. E., Govan, J. R., Doherty, C. J., Webb, A. K., & Jones, A. M. (2008). The changing epidemiology of Burkholderia species infection at an adult cystic fibrosis centre. Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, 7(5), 368–372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcf.2008.01.002

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