Radiofrequency thermal balloon coronary angioplasty: A new device for successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

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Abstract

Objtctives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermal balloon percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty using radiofrequency energy in the treatment of patients with failed coronary angioplasty and complex lesions. In addition, we evaluated restenosis after radiofrequency thermal balloon. Background. The efficacy of coronary angioplasty is limited by the relatively low success rate in complex lesions and the high frequency of restenosis. Few reports have studied the combined effects of pressure and laser thermal energy. This study describes a new device for coronary angioplasty using radiofrequency thermal energy. Methods. Thirty-two patients with failed conventional coronary angioplasty or complex lesions were treated with radiofrequency thermal balloon coronary angioplasty. Radiofrequency energy was delivered up to 11 times in exposures ranging from 30 to 60 s in duration. This combined effect allowed the vascular wall to be heated to temperatures ranging from 60 to 70 °C. Follow-up coronary angiography was performed, on average, 6 months after the procedure. Results. Successful radiofrequency coronary angioplasty was achieved in 28 (82%) of 34 lesions. There was one abrupt coronary artery occlusion (3%) and no death, perforation or dissection. Angiographic restenosis occurred in 14 (56%) of 25 lesions. Conclusions. In patients with failed coronary angioplasty and difficult complex lesions, radiofrequency coronary angioplasty could potentially improve angioplasty success rates and may have important implications for bailout cases with abrupt occlusion. However, restenosis remains a significant problem. © 1994.

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APA

Yamashita, K., Satake, S., Ohira, H., & Ohtomo, K. (1994). Radiofrequency thermal balloon coronary angioplasty: A new device for successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 23(2), 336–340. https://doi.org/10.1016/0735-1097(94)90416-2

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