Human papilloma virus and cervical neoplasia in HIV positive women: A non systematic review

  • Nweke I
  • Nwadike V
  • Kalu I
  • et al.
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Abstract

Human papilloma-virus (HPV) infection confers 85-90% of the attributable risk for the development of cervical dysplasia. Worldwide and in particular in Nigeria, HPV 16 has been shown as the most prevalent HPV type and it also contributes more to the development of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Studies have also shown that the prevalence of HPV is higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women of all age groups. HIV-positive women also have a higher incidence of squamous intra-epithelial lesion (SIL) and invasive cervical cancer. Progression to cervical cancer is also more rapid amongst these patients and often refractory to treatment with high incidence rates. Current screening recommendations for HIV-positive women are accessible and developed in rich countries. The best strategy for screening infected women in poorer nations where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is rampant remains uncertain and challenging.

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APA

Nweke, I. G., Nwadike, V. U., Kalu, I. E., & Ojide, K. C. (2014). Human papilloma virus and cervical neoplasia in HIV positive women: A non systematic review. African Journal of Microbiology Research, 8(22), 2193–2201. https://doi.org/10.5897/ajmr2014.6649

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