Working for less: the aftermath for journalists made redundant in Australia between 2012 and 2014

  • Zion L
  • Dodd A
  • Sherwood M
  • et al.
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Abstract

While media organisations continue to lay off journalists in Australia, the long-term outcomes of mass redundancies are just beginning to unravel. A key finding from a survey sample of 225 Australian journalists who exited their jobs between 2012 and 2014 is that while just over 60% of respondents continued to work wholly or partly in journalism roles, income loss was significant across the board. This is partly explained by the precarity of work experienced by many participants post-redundancy. But lower incomes were also noted amongst those who remained in full-time journalism positions: indeed, those who moved to full-time roles in other professions were likely to be earning more. Meanwhile, the finding that those aged over 50 faced the most significant drop in income points to particular problems faced by older workforce participants.

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Zion, L., Dodd, A., Sherwood, M., O’Donnell, P., Marjoribanks, T., & Ricketson, M. (2016). Working for less: the aftermath for journalists made redundant in Australia between 2012 and 2014. Communication Research and Practice, 2(2), 117–136. https://doi.org/10.1080/22041451.2016.1185924

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