Indigenous media studies in Australia: Traditions, theories and contemporary practices

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Abstract

Kerry McCallum and Lisa Waller locate the diverse, abundant and dynamic field of Indigenous media within the rapidly changing broader Australian media landscape. While there are some parallels with the ethnic media sector, this chapter shows that the unique development of the Indigenous media sector has been determined by Australia’s colonial past and its complex political and policy history. Simultaneously, Indigenous people have developed their own media for self-determination, sovereignty, cultural representation and for talking back to those in power. The development of a dynamic community broadcasting sector and the flourishing of Indigenous digital media provides Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a voice that enables them to make strategic incursions into policy debates.

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McCallum, K., & Waller, L. (2017). Indigenous media studies in Australia: Traditions, theories and contemporary practices. In Minorities and Media: Producers, Industries, Audiences (pp. 105–124). Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-59631-4_6

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