Altered functional connectivity in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease: A resting-state fMRI study

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Abstract

Patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) may hold a high risk of cognitive impairment (CI) by affecting the functional connectivity (FC) of resting-state networks (RSNs). Current studies have mainly focused on the patients with CI but have ignored the prodromal stage when people suffered subcortical vascular damage, but without CI. Independent component analysis (ICA) of rs-fMRI could detect altered FC in RSNs at the early stage of the disease. 81 SIVD patients with CI (SVCI = 29) and without CI (pre-SVCI = 25), and 27 normal controls (NCs) were scanned with rs-fMRI, analyzed by ICA and assessed by neuropsychological examinations. We found significantly altered FC within the RSNs of sensorimotor network (SMN), posterior default mode networks (pDMN), right frontoparietal network (rFPN) and language network (LN) (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected). The pre-SVCI group showed significantly increased FC in brain regions of the multiple RSNs when compared with the other two groups. The mean values extracted from the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG.R) and the left posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG.L) were significantly correlated with clock drawing test (CDT). The right precentral/postcentral gyrus (PreCG.R/PoCG.R) and the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG.R) were positively correlated with Stroop-1 Test. We concluded the FC in RSNs had already been changed at the early stage of the disease as the maladaptive response or compensatory reallocation of the cognitive resources. The ICA of rs-fMRI can be applied as a potential approach to identify the underlying mechanisms of SIVD.

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APA

Liu, X., Chen, L., Cheng, R., Luo, T., Lv, F. J., Fang, W., … Jiang, P. (2019). Altered functional connectivity in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease: A resting-state fMRI study. Brain Research, 1715, 126–133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2019.03.022

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