Effect of a patient engagement tool on positive airway pressure adherence: analysis of a German healthcare provider database

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Abstract

Objective/background This study investigated the addition of a real-time feedback patient engagement tool on positive airway pressure (PAP) adherence when added to a proactive telemedicine strategy. Patients/methods Data from a German healthcare provider (ResMed Healthcare Germany) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who first started PAP therapy between 1 September 2009 and 30 April 2014, and were managed using telemedicine (AirView™; proactive care) or telemedicine + patient engagement tool (AirView™ + myAir™; patient engagement) were eligible. Patient demographics, therapy start date, sleep-disordered breathing indices, device usage hours, and therapy termination rate were obtained and compared between the two groups. Results The first 500 patients managed by telemedicine-guided care and a patient engagement tool were matched with 500 patients managed by telemedicine-guided care only. The proportion of nights with device usage ≥4 h was 77 ± 25% in the patient engagement group versus 63 ± 32% in the proactive care group (p < 0.001). Therapy termination occurred less often in the patient engagement group (p < 0.001). The apnea-hypopnea index was similar in the two groups, but leak was significantly lower in the patient engagement versus proactive care group (2.7 ± 4.0 vs 4.1 ± 5.3 L/min; p < 0.001). Conclusions Addition of a patient engagement tool to telemonitoring-guided proactive care was associated with higher device usage and lower leak. This suggests that addition of an engagement tool may help improve PAP therapy adherence and reduce mask leak.

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APA

Woehrle, H., Arzt, M., Graml, A., Fietze, I., Young, P., Teschler, H., & Ficker, J. H. (2018). Effect of a patient engagement tool on positive airway pressure adherence: analysis of a German healthcare provider database. Sleep Medicine, 41, 20–26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2017.07.026

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