Identification of an Early–Middle Jurassic oxidized magmatic belt, south Gangdese, Tibet, and geological implications

17Citations
Citations of this article
10Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

The south Gangdese region is the site of subduction of the Neo-Tethys and subsequent continental collision. Compared with widespread Cretaceous and Cenozoic magmatism, Early–Middle Jurassic magmatic rocks and related deposits are rarely reported. Our work identified a >200 km long felsic rock belt associated with Cu mineralization in the south Gangdese region. We report here zircon U–Pb ages, zircon Ce4+/Ce3+ values, and mineral assemblages of two Cu mineralized intrusions within the belt. A hornblende granite and a diorite porphyry were emplaced at 177.3 Ma and 166.3 Ma, respectively. Geological occurrence and magmatic hematite–magnetite–chalcopyrite intergrowths suggest that Cu mineralization formed coeval with Jurassic intrusions. Mineralized intrusions have high zircon Ce4+/Ce3+ and EuN/EuN∗ ratios, and hematite–magnetite intergrowths, suggesting their parent magmas were highly oxidized. Hornblende is common and primary fluid inclusions are found in titanite and apatite, indicating their parent magmas were water-saturated and exsolved volatile phases at early stage of magmatic evolution. Those magma characters contribute to the formation of porphyry Cu deposits. Given that majority subduction-related porphyry Cu systems have been eroded following uplift and denudation, the well-preserved Early–Middle Jurassic Cu mineralized igneous rocks in south Gangdese are favorable prospecting targets for subduction-related porphyry Cu deposits.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Zou, Y., Chen, X., Huang, W., Zhang, J., Liang, H., Xu, J., & Chen, L. (2017). Identification of an Early–Middle Jurassic oxidized magmatic belt, south Gangdese, Tibet, and geological implications. Science Bulletin, 62(12), 888–898. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scib.2017.05.026

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free