Defining the need for blood and blood products transfusion following suicide bombing attacks on a civilian population: A level i single-centre experience

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Abstract

Introduction: Knowledge of patterns of blood use in the care of mass casualty settings is important for preparedness of medical centre resources and for maximising survival when blood supplies are limited. Our objectives were to review of our experience with the use of blood products and define the utilisation of blood transfusion following suicide bombing attacks. Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of blood and blood product transfusion following civilian bombing attacks at a level I trauma centre in Jerusalem, Israel from 2000 to 2005. The study group consisted of 137 patients who were admitted following 17 suicide bombing attacks which were carried out in Jerusalem during the 5-year period. Demographic data, number of units of blood and blood products transfused and the need for massive transfusions were recorded and analyzed. Results: Fifty-three patients received blood transfusions (38.7%). There were 33 males (62.2%) with a median ISS of 13 (range 4-25). These 53 patients received 524 PRBC, 42 WB, and 449 FFP. The mean number of PRBC transfused/admitted patient was 3.82 units (range 0-59). Thirty patients (21.9%) received 236 PRBC (45% of total PRBC) at the first 2 h. The ratio of ordered to transfused blood was 946:524. The FFP:PRBC ratio for all transfused patients was 1:1.17. The number of PRBC transfused per attack correlated with the number of patients admitted per attack. The most commonly transfused blood type was A (52.3%). Only 18 units of uncrossed-matched blood were transfused (3.3% of total). 14 patients (10.2%) received massive transfusions. These patients received 399 PRBC (76.1% of total units transfused) and the average number of PRBC transfused was 28.5/patient (10-59). Conclusions: More than 1/3 of casualties admitted following civilian bombing attacks received transfusions, most in the first 2 h. Large-scale attacks will require more blood and blood products than small-scale attacks. Twice the number of PRBC ordered than transfused reflects a known trend for over-triage during the initial assessment following bombing attacks. One tenth of patients received massive transfusion. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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Bala, M., Kaufman, T., Keidar, A., Zelig, O., Zamir, G., Mudhi-Orenshat, S., … Almogy, G. (2014). Defining the need for blood and blood products transfusion following suicide bombing attacks on a civilian population: A level i single-centre experience. Injury, 45(1), 50–55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2012.11.011

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