Prevalence and Factors Influencing Depression among Adolescents with Type-1 Diabetes – A Cross-Sectional Study

  • N B
  • Praveen K
  • Rashmi N
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Abstract

Background: Type 1 diabetes is the third most common paediatric endocrine disease. India accounts for most of the adolescents with T1DM in South-East Asia. Adolescents with diabetes are at higher risk of developing several psychological disorders due to the psychosocial stress posed by the condition. Depression is the commonest among these illnesses and necessitates active and early detection by screening strategies. Materials and Methodology: This Hospital Based Cross sectional study was conducted for the period of six months. All the Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes visiting the hospital during the study period were included. Details regarding socio-demographic characteristics, diabetes and glycemic status were collected in a pre tested structured questionnaire by interview technique. Symptoms suggestive of depression were collected using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Results: Among 30 Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes included in the present study, majority, 18 (60%) were in the age group of less than 14 years and 20 (66.7%) were females. The magnitude of depression among the study subjects was 18 (60%) of which majority of the subjects 12 (80%) were having mild depression. There was a significant association between depression and uncontrolled glycemic status, higher dosage of insulin intake and not strictly following the dietary practices. Conclusion: There was a high burden of depression in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. There was a significant relationship between the preventable factors like glycemic control and dietary practices with depression.

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N, B., Praveen, K., & Rashmi, N. (2017). Prevalence and Factors Influencing Depression among Adolescents with Type-1 Diabetes – A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Medicine and Public Health, 7(3), 162–165. https://doi.org/10.5530/ijmedph.2017.3.33

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