Variation of bacterial and archaeal community structures in a full-scale constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment

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Abstract

Microorganisms play important roles in the reduction of organic and inorganic pollutants in constructed wetlands used for the treatment of wastewater. However, the diversity and structure of microbial community in constructed wetland system remain poorly known. In this study, the Illumina MiSeq Sequencing of 16S rDNA was used to analyze the bacterial and archaeal microbial community structures of soil and water in a free surface flow constructed wetland, and the differences of bacterial communities and archaeal compositions between soil and water were compared. The results showed that the Proteobacteria were the dominant bacteria, making up 35.38%~48.66% relative abundance. Euryarchaeotic were the absolute dominant archaea in the influent sample with the relative abundance of 93.29%, while Thaumarchaeota showed dominance in the other three samples, making up 50.58%~75.70%. The relative abundances of different species showed great changes in bacteria and archaea, and the number of dominant species in bacteria was much higher than that in archaea. Compared to archaea, the community compositions of bacteria were more abundant and the changes were more significant. Meanwhile, bacteria and archaea had large differences in compositions between water and soil. The microbial richness in water was significantly higher than that in soil. Simultaneously, soil had a significant enrichment effect on some microbial flora.

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Lang, X. L., Chen, X., Xu, A. L., Song, Z. W., Wang, X., & Wang, H. B. (2018). Variation of bacterial and archaeal community structures in a full-scale constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Archaea, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9319345

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