Does the addition of hyaluronidase improve the quality of peribulbar anesthesia in cataract surgery? – A randomized double blinded study

1Citations
Citations of this article
7Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the necessity of hyaluronidase as an anesthetic adjuvant for peribulbar anesthesia during cataract surgery and to assess differences in anesthetic outcomes in the absence of hyaluronidase. Methods: In this double blinded randomized study, 202 patients reporting for surgery for senile cataract in their first eye under regional ocular anesthesia without pre-existing extra ocular movement restriction were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group 1 – anesthesia without hyaluronidase, Group 2 – anesthesia with 50 IU/ml Hyaluronidase. Peribulbar block with 5 ml of anesthetic mixture of 2% lignocaine with 1:200000 adrenaline and 0.5% bupivacaine with or without hyaluronidase was performed with 3 ml deposited in the infero-medial quadrant and 2 ml in the supero-medial quadrant followed by ocular massage. Surgeons’ score for akinesia, patients’ score for analgesia, augmentation of block if any and extra ocular movements on first post-operative day were compared between the groups. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in akinesia (p = 0.22, 0.68 and 0.98), analgesia (p = 0.44 and 0.09) or requirement of anesthetic augmentation (p = 0.3). Extraocular movement restriction was not noted in any patient. Onset of akinesia and analgesia was earlier in Group 2 (p = 0.004 and p = 0.005 respectively). Conclusions: Hyaluronidase is not an essential adjuvant for peribulbar block for cataract surgeries. Appropriate deposition of a smaller volume of anesthetic agent and adequate ocular massage provide adequate and safe anesthesia.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Swathi, N., Srikanth, K., & Venipriya, S. (2018). Does the addition of hyaluronidase improve the quality of peribulbar anesthesia in cataract surgery? – A randomized double blinded study. Saudi Journal of Ophthalmology, 32(3), 204–210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjopt.2018.02.013

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free