Methamphetamine self-administration elicits sex-related changes in postsynaptic glutamate transmission in the prefrontal cortex

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Abstract

Preclinical and clinical research has shown that females are more vulnerable to the rewarding effects of stimulants, and it has been proposed that estrogens may play a role in this enhanced sensitivity; however sex differences in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neuroplasticity have not been explored. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded from the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex (PL-PFC) of male and female rats following long access METH self-administration (SA) and investigated the resulting long-term synaptic neuroad-aptations. Males and females took similar amounts of METH during SA; however, female rats exhibit significant synaptic baseline differences when compared to males. Furthermore, females exhibited a significant increase in evoked excitatory currents. This increase in evoked glutamate was correlated with increases in NMDA currents and was not affected by application of a GluN2B selective blocker. We propose that METH SA selectively upregulates GluN2B-lacking NMDA receptors (NMDAR) in the PFC of female rats. Our results may provide a mechanistic explanation for the sex differences reported for METH addiction in females.

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Pena-Bravo, J. I., Penrod, R., Reichel, C. M., & Lavin, A. (2019). Methamphetamine self-administration elicits sex-related changes in postsynaptic glutamate transmission in the prefrontal cortex. ENeuro, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0401-18.2018

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