Perioperative cardiac function and predictors for adverse events after transmyocardial laser treatment

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Abstract

Background. Previous studies have reported that mortality and morbidity after transmyocardial laser treatment (TML) mainly occur perioperatively. The present study was designed to evaluate left-ventricular function and identify risk factors for cardiac-related adverse events in this phase. Methods. Forty-nine patients were studied. The inclusion criteria were angina pectoris Canadian Cardiovascular Society Angina Score (CCSAS) class III and IV refractory to medical therapy and untreatable by coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, age less than 75 years, left ventricular ejection fraction greater than or equal to 30%, and myocardial regions with reversible ischemia. Hemodynamic data and cardiac adverse events were registered. The follow-up time was 30 days. Results. A transient decrease in mean cardiac index (CI) was observed, reaching its minimum immediately after end of the surgical procedure (1.8 ± 0.4, p < 0.01 vs baseline). Two patients (4%) died during the postoperative period (30 days). Seventeen patients (35%) experienced adverse cardiac-related events, where CCSAS class IV, unprotected left main stem stenosis, and diabetes mellitus were identified as risk factors in a multivariate analysis. Conclusions. A transient impairment of left ventricular function was observed after TML. The morbidity and mortality after TML were almost exclusively cardiac-related, identifying CCSAS class IV, unprotected left main stem stenosis, and diabetes as risk factors. (C) 2000 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

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APA

Tjomsland, O., Aaberge, L., Almdahl, S. M., Dragsund, M., Moelstad, P., Saatvedt, K., & Nordstrand, K. (2000). Perioperative cardiac function and predictors for adverse events after transmyocardial laser treatment. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 69(4), 1098–1103. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(99)01573-8

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