Automated cortical auditory evoked potentials threshold estimation in neonates

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Abstract

Introduction: The evaluation of cortical auditory evoked potential has been the focus of scientific studies in infants. Some authors have reported that automated response detection is effective in exploring these potentials in infants, but few have reported their efficacy in the search for thresholds. Objective: To analyze the latency, amplitude and thresholds of cortical auditory evoked potential using an automatic response detection device in a neonatal population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional, observational study. Cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded in response to pure-tone stimuli of the frequencies 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz presented in an intensity range between 0 and 80 dB HL using a single channel recording. P1 was performed in an exclusively automated fashion, using Hotelling's T 2 statistical test. The latency and amplitude were obtained manually by three examiners. The study comprised 39 neonates up to 28 days old of both sexes with presence of otoacoustic emissions and no risk factors for hearing loss. Results: With the protocol used, cortical auditory evoked potential responses were detected in all subjects at high intensity and thresholds. The mean thresholds were 24.8 ± 10.4 dB NA, 25 ± 9.0 dB NA, 28 ± 7.8 dB NA and 29.4 ± 6.6 dB HL for 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, respectively. Conclusion: Reliable responses were obtained in the assessment of cortical auditory potentials in the neonates assessed with a device for automatic response detection.

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Oliveira, L. S., Didoné, D. D., & Durante, A. S. (2019). Automated cortical auditory evoked potentials threshold estimation in neonates. Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, 85(2), 206–212. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjorl.2018.01.001

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