The influence of non-breathing-related sleep fragmentation on cognitive function in patients with cerebral small vessel disease

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Abstract

Background: Cognitive impairment in patients with cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is common, but the pathogenic mechanism is not well understood. The situation of non-breathing-related sleep fragmentation in CSVD patients and its influence on cognitive impairment is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of non-breathing-related sleep fragmentation on cognitive function in patients with CSVD. Methods: A group of 89 CSVD patients without breathing-related sleep disorders in the Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University was enrolled. The patients underwent magnetic resonance scan, polysomnography, cognitive function evaluation using Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale (MoCA), and Mini-Mental State Examination. The patients were assigned to study group (arousal index [ArI] ≥26.8/hour) or control group (ArI <26.8/hour) based on the average level of ArI (mean =26.8, SD =7.5) at night, and the cognitive function of the patients in the two groups was analyzed. Results: The total MoCA score, the subscale scores of visuospatial ability and delayed recall in the study group were significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). The cognitive impairment measured by MoCA was positively related to ArI level and %N-3 sleep according to the results of logistic regression (P<0.05). Conclusion: Non-breathing-related sleep fragmentation is associated with cognitive impairment in CSVD patients, especially executive function and delayed recall ability.

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Wang, J., Chen, X., Liao, J., Zhou, L., Liao, S., Shan, Y., … Tao, J. (2019). The influence of non-breathing-related sleep fragmentation on cognitive function in patients with cerebral small vessel disease. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 15, 1009–1014. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S193869

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