Objective and Subjective Outcomes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery for Treatment of Patients with Extremely Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Apnea-Hypopnea Index >100)

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Abstract

Purpose It is important for patients and treating clinicians to know whether maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery is effective when treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and an extremely high apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score. The purpose of this study was to evaluate objective and subjective treatment outcomes after MMA surgery for the treatment of OSAS in patients with a preoperative AHI score higher than 100. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included all patients who underwent MMA surgery for OSAS by members of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, QEII Health Science Centre (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) from November 1996 through February 2014. Objective data were available in the form of polysomnographs (PSGs) obtained before and a minimum of 6 months after surgery. Patients completed a self-administered questionnaire before and after surgery regarding snoring, witnessed apneas, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use, daytime somnolence, and overall satisfaction. Results Two hundred sixty-five patients had MMA surgery, of which 13 had pre- and postoperative PSGs. PSGs showed a mean preoperative AHI score of 117.9 and a mean postsurgical AHI score of 16.1 (P <.001). Pre- and postoperative questionnaires were available for 9 patients. After surgery, 7 patients denied having any daytime sleepiness and 2 patients reported minimal daytime sleepiness. The mean preoperative Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 12.9 (standard deviation [SD], 5.5), whereas the postoperative mean score was 5.0 (SD, 4.1; P =.004). Before surgery, all 9 patients reported loud snoring and 8 reported witnessed apneas. After surgery, 2 patients reported minimal snoring and only 1 patient continued to have witnessed apneas. Six patients used CPAP preoperatively and only 1 patient continued to use CPAP after surgery. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that MMA surgery for treatment of extremely severe OSA can be a highly successful 1-stage surgery, which eliminates the use of CPAP, improves subjective outcomes, and considerably decreases the AHI score.

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APA

Goodday, R. H., Bourque, S. E., & Edwards, P. B. (2016). Objective and Subjective Outcomes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery for Treatment of Patients with Extremely Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Apnea-Hypopnea Index >100). Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 74(3), 583–589. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2015.07.016

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